Lincoln Christmas Fair

I gave myself a day off yesterday for Christmas shopping at the Lincoln Christmas Fair. Being completely disorganised and not sure who I needed to buy for let alone what I was going to get them, I spent more time taking photos than I did actually shopping.

It was a lovely day, not too cold, there was lots of Christmassy food to try and the air was filled with all kinds of Christmassy smells. The entertainment was good and my favourite character was a man standing on a corner in a lit up Christmas hat selling ‘Big tissues.’ It took me an embarrassingly long time to work out the joke.

These are a few of the photos I took at the fair.

 

 

Yorkshire Sculpture Park… Again

This weekend I returned to the Yorkshire Sculpture Park, this time with some young family members in tow. Now that autumn has properly set in the leaves are turning, the colours are glorious and the park looks very different from when I saw it a couple of weeks ago.

This time I focussed on the autumn colours but couldn’t resist taking a few family photos too. Click the image below to see a slideshow of some of the images.

Yorkshire Sculpture Park

Colchester Castle

The castle is Norman but built on the ruins of a Roman temple that itself was built when Colchester was the Roman capital of Britain.

After visiting the Martin Parr exhibition last week I took a walk up to the castle and through the park on my way to the station.

The castle is Norman but built on the ruins of a Roman temple that itself was built when Colchester was the Roman capital of Britain. The keep is the largest ever built in the UK and one and half times bigger than the White Tower at the Tower of London. Some people have speculated that it could have had up to four storeys.

There are some great exhibitions inside the castle that explain the history of the town but today I wanted to stay outside and walk around the extensive park. I believe the park was first landscaped by the Victorians and still wins awards. I think one of my first dates was a visit to the park and a game of crazy golf! I have been to many many events held here over the years from fireworks displays to proms in the park and the military tattoo but it is also lovely just listening to whatever is playing in the bandstand on a sunny afternoon.

Aldeburgh

A sunny day in Aldeburgh

The other weekend I spent a sunny few hours in Aldeburgh, Suffolk. It is a lovely, if stoney, beach that seemingly goes on for miles. I had the chance to walk around for a bit with my camera but unfortunately didn’t quite make it to Maggi Hambling’s beach sculpture.

I understand that Alde Burgh means ‘Old Fort’ but there is no evidence of a fort today as the landscape has changed over the years and what was once an important tudor marine town has mostly been lost to the sea. Now it is a place where people look to purchase a second or holiday home and where expensive boutiques, pretty gift shops and notable fish and chip shops line the main street. It is famous as being the home of composer Benjamin Britten and his partner Peter Pears and also as the place where Francis Drake’s Golden hind was built.

These are a few of the photos I took. They are a bit more saturated than I would usually choose but after a visit to the Martin Parr exhibition I felt that it was time for a little more colour!

 

St Botolph’s Priory

Actually called the priory of St Julien and St Botolph this is the first Augustinian priory in the UK.

While I was in Colchester I took the opportunity to take a few photographs in the town centre. I can’t believe that I have never taken photos of some of the main sights before!

First up was a quick visit to St Botolph’s Priory. I think the last time I went in here was more than 30 years ago on my way home from school one night. Then it was a bit of risky place to be as it was frequented by undesirables but since then it has been cleaned up, made into a nice park and I thought it was a very pleasant place to be.

Actually called the priory of St Julien and St Botolph this is the first Augustinian priory in the UK. It was built by the Saxons, probably using some Roman bricks from earlier buildings and was founded as a priory around 1100 and was the place where canons lived together and served the town. Although the priory closed and was partially demolished in 1536 the church remained open until the civil war in the 1640s when it was caught in the crossfire of the assault on South Gate. A Gothic Victorian church was built next to the priory in 1837 and it is this church that still stands and is active today.